The Fallacy of Eyesight

Caleb has had a favorite song for over six years, Matt Redman’s Blessed Be Your Name performed by the Newsboys. I will share a few verses in a minute but something just happened that I have to tell you about.

We have an Alexa device that doesn’t understand Caleb, so he asked me to request the song while he was eating lunch.

I made his favorite macaroni and cheese, mostly tuning out the first part of the song that I have heard a million times.

These verses are out of order but I’ve grouped them so you might understand Caleb’s reaction.

Every blessing You pour out, I’ll
Turn back to praise
When the darkness closes in, Lord
Still I will say… Blessed be your name

Blessed be Your name
On the road marked with suffering
Though there’s pain in the offering
Blessed be Your name

It’s so easy to assume that just because Caleb can’t always express emotion that he can’t feel everything like we all do. This is a fatal misunderstanding.

As the song ended, I went to get his plate and cup. He was wiping his eyes. Caleb cries like many young boys I have seen. No tears actually fall, but his eyes turn red and he pinches the bridge of his nose with his thumb and forefinger, trying to keep those tears from ever escaping.

Though not frequent, I know it signals something profound. I know he is feeling pain that is usually suppressed. I don’t know where the sadness goes and it hurts to think of him keeping so much pain inside instead of letting me or someone else help.

Caleb is one of the happiest people you will ever meet. He loves all things light and funny and when something tickles him, he roars with a deep belly laugh that crescendos into a high pitched squeal. He and my boyfriend have more private jokes than I’ve had in a lifetime. Caleb often laughs at nothing at all. He seeks joy constantly. He abhors sadness and anger.

When I saw him wiping his tears, the words from the song hit me like ice.

God you give and take away
Oh you give and take away
But my heart will choose to say
Lord, blessed be Your name

When it ended, I asked, “You love that song, don’t you, buddy.”

Through red eyes, Caleb replied, “Yeah.”

“Why is it your favorite,” I asked.

His answer shattered me

“The story of my life.”

Caleb does love The Story of My Life by One Direction, I believe for the same reason he loves Blessed Be Your Name.

Come closer to hear how profound this is. Caleb tests cognitively around age 5 but I believe he is much more advanced and that standardized testing isn’t sensitive enough to truly measure cognition. We don’t have the tools to measure intelligence that doesn’t fit into neat little boxes. We are missing out on so much by dismissing those who can’t ace an SAT or IQ test.

I’ve actually gotten angry with professionals who tell me Caleb’s IQ. To one, I said, “How about we give you an IQ test in Mandarin right now?” But I digress.

I see Caleb’s insight and intelligence in how he has analyzed and interpreted these two songs. It confounds me because the theme of both songs is a deep philosophical musing about one’s life. The lyrics require the listener to reflect and to search for an answer about why things happen. They require the listener to accept that which we can’t change.

One of Caleb’s challenges is that his diagnosis of 22Q chromosome deletion syndrome greatly impacted his brain. In this syndrome, there are already assumed learning differences and often some form of mental retardation. A geneticist told me years ago that when autopsies have been performed on someone with 22Q, in their brain there is white matter where there is supposed to be grey matter and vice versa. He said that where you and I have freeways, Caleb and others like him have cul-de-sacs. Some information can never, ever get through.

Imagine living a day like this. Knowing something, wanting to answer a question, wanting to ask a question, wanting to express anything only to have it blocked by your brain. It would be worse than that awful feeling of having something on the tip of your tongue. I can’t conceive of the level of frustration and hopelessness that must plague Caleb every minute of every day.

In addition to the issues from the syndrome, Caleb had open-heart surgery at four days of age. During surgery, the medical team had to stop Caleb’s circulation and keep his brain on ice for four hours, ending with a full blood transfusion. I’m not a doctor but I’ve read articles that insinuate that perhaps Caleb’s surgery went too long, that his brain was deprived of oxygen to the extent that significant mental retardation was the result. I don’t blame the doctors. I wanted my baby, in whatever state they could return him to me.

Caleb suffered several febrile (high fever) seizures until he turned five.  A 105 degree fever overwhelmed his system and a seizure was the way to bring his temperature back to normal. During them, he would turn blue and it would seem like he wasn’t breathing. I believe those contributed as well.

I’ve written how, in 2006, Caleb broke his femur at school. Surgery followed that afternoon and when I could see Caleb again, he was burning up. His body can’t regulate temperature and I believe his fever was 107. Though he was past the age where he would have a febrile seizure, Sophie and I believe he had several seizures that day, perhaps in surgery and in the recovery room. Again, the doctors did all they could and I place no blame. I wanted to get my baby home.

If you look at pictures of Caleb before and after the femur break, it’s as if you can see a dimming in the light behind his gorgeous baby blue eyes. It’s permanent and such a startling change. There are moments where he is especially engaged and you can get a sweet glimpse of who he could have been without this syndrome. Friends call it 10 seconds of typical. It gives me such hope and I yearn to wrap him in bubble wrap so the typical boy never goes away. But it recedes like a tide and is just as difficult to chase.

I share all of this about Caleb’s mental condition so that you may understand that Caleb crying today over a song was actually him screaming out that he knows his life has been difficult, and that he accepts it. Socrates would be so impressed that Caleb knows his precept: “The unexamined life is not worth living.”

So many people underestimate Caleb and those like him and I’m writing this to shout that these marvelous people know. There is sentient, deep, reflective, insightful intelligence locked inside someone who looks inferior to many people. Please, when you see someone challenged, wave if they look like they’d like it, smile if it looks like they may smile back, or simply ask for a blessing for them as you pass by.

We were at Wal-Mart today and Caleb saw row after row of Valentine’s Day heart boxes. I usually pick one out for him, but he was so excited I told him he could pick his own. He roared his happy growl with that squeal at the end and a Wal-Mart employee smiled so engagingly at him that I said, over my shoulder, “Thank you so much for thinking that was cute.”

“But he is cute,” she said.

“I know,” I responded, “but I love when others see it too.”

Even though I’m focusing on what Caleb can express, there is something more painful with which he has to deal. Caleb, I believe, understands everything. He’s teaching himself to read by memorizing song titles and then typing them into his iPad. He’s mostly quiet, but he’s taking in all of the conversations around him, even things I don’t want him to hear.

I’ve been writing about the denial we received for Caleb to live in residential housing. I filed an appeal a few weeks ago, in an eight-page single-spaced plea to our state’s DDSN board. This week I received a letter from the state director, telling me that she read my appeal and is overturning the denial and placing him on the waitlist, for which I am eternally grateful.

Caleb has been picking up on all of this new language about a home. I haven’t told him directly because there is nothing available at this time. Telling him now would only fill him with anxiety and fear that don’t have an end-date. I will only tell him when a decision has been made.

I know it will be so difficult for him at first but I also know that he will thrive in a structured setting with friends and a caretaker. It will take time and if it doesn’t work, I’ll bring him back home if I am physically able. From all he has gleaned from overheard conversations, I know he can sense a major change on the horizon.

So this is the final verse of the song that muses on good times and hard times, triumphs and challenges:

Blessed be the name of the Lord
Blessed be Your name
Blessed be the name of the Lord
Blessed be Your glorious name

Blessed be Your name

My amazing Caleb lives a life of complete trust in God. I’ve never seen a more pure example of a good and faithful servant and I’m grateful, humbled and beyond blessed to be his mom.

Photo credit: Medium

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2 thoughts on “The Fallacy of Eyesight

  1. Karen Reece February 10, 2019 / 3:58 pm

    Wow another great article.  Made me cry.  We can always hope for more understanding Fromm all people.

    Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

    Like

    • Kate Welch February 10, 2019 / 4:00 pm

      Thank you. So glad you were able to read this.

      Like

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